A Time For Living

Aug 04

danslegsareonfire:

maccasmiz:

the-infallible-empress:

molto-bene-sherlock:

Prince William, Prince Charles, and now Prince George…

The royal family is slowly transforming into the Weasleys.

AND THEN THERE’S HARRY

WHO IRONICALLY IS THE ONLY GINGER ONE

best post ever

Aug 04

brightslap:

the-science-llama:

So I saw some gifs and decided to fix them.

it makes me happy that at least one of them is dream-building

Jul 24
thoughtsfromcloudnine:

God bless you BBC

thoughtsfromcloudnine:

God bless you BBC

Jul 24

avenatural:

can i just say that i honestly think this was the best tv promo ive ever seen

i mean like god DAAAAAMN WORK IT

image

holy mother of god asdfghjkl

Jul 24
wildcat2030:

An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait
There’s a school of thought that maintains we humans are mostly just composites of stardust and space matter. But regardless of where you think we came from, it’s probably safe to assume that we didn’t look half as pretty as the celestial portraits Sergio Albiac creates. The Barcelona-based artist‘s most recent project, Stardust Portraits, takes user-submitted photos and transforms the subjects from basic Earthlings to otherworldly cosmic beings. (via An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait | Wired Design | Wired.com)

wildcat2030:

An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait

There’s a school of thought that maintains we humans are mostly just composites of stardust and space matter. But regardless of where you think we came from, it’s probably safe to assume that we didn’t look half as pretty as the celestial portraits Sergio Albiac creates. The Barcelona-based artist‘s most recent project, Stardust Portraits, takes user-submitted photos and transforms the subjects from basic Earthlings to otherworldly cosmic beings. (via An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait | Wired Design | Wired.com)

Jul 20
I believe that there are enough people willing to change. However, is the will strong enough to make its move now, before there is too much damage done that all we may do is regret?

I believe that there are enough people willing to change. However, is the will strong enough to make its move now, before there is too much damage done that all we may do is regret?

Jul 20
lensblr-network:

Self Discovery.
by Zac Santanello  (zacsantanello.tumblr.com)
Jul 20
Jul 20
wildcat2030:


Humans: the real threat to life on Earth
If population levels continue to rise at the current rate, our grandchildren will see the Earth plunged into an unprecedented environmental crisis, argues computational scientist Stephen Emmott in this extract from his book Ten Billion

-
Earth is home to millions of species. Just one dominates it. Us. Our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities have modified almost every part of our planet. In fact, we are having a profound impact on it. Indeed, our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities are now the drivers of every global problem we face. And every one of these problems is accelerating as we continue to grow towards a global population of 10 billion. In fact, I believe we can rightly call the situation we’re in right now an emergency – an unprecedented planetary emergency.
We humans emerged as a species about 200,000 years ago. In geological time, that is really incredibly recent. Just 10,000 years ago, there were one million of us. By 1800, just over 200 years ago, there were 1 billion of us. By 1960, 50 years ago, there were 3 billion of us. There are now over 7 billion of us. By 2050, your children, or your children’s children, will be living on a planet with at least 9 billion other people. Some time towards the end of this century, there will be at least 10 billion of us. Possibly more.
We got to where we are now through a number of civilisation- and society-shaping “events”, most notably the agricultural revolution, the scientific revolution, the industrial revolution and – in the West – the public-health revolution. By 1980, there were 4 billion of us on the planet. Just 10 years later, in 1990, there were 5 billion of us. By this point initial signs of the consequences of our growth were starting to show. Not the least of these was on water. Our demand for water – not just the water we drank but the water we needed for food production and to make all the stuff we were consuming – was going through the roof. But something was starting to happen to water. (via Humans – the real threat to life on Earth | Environment | The Observer)

wildcat2030:

Humans: the real threat to life on Earth

If population levels continue to rise at the current rate, our grandchildren will see the Earth plunged into an unprecedented environmental crisis, argues computational scientist Stephen Emmott in this extract from his book Ten Billion

-

Earth is home to millions of species. Just one dominates it. Us. Our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities have modified almost every part of our planet. In fact, we are having a profound impact on it. Indeed, our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities are now the drivers of every global problem we face. And every one of these problems is accelerating as we continue to grow towards a global population of 10 billion. In fact, I believe we can rightly call the situation we’re in right now an emergency – an unprecedented planetary emergency.

We humans emerged as a species about 200,000 years ago. In geological time, that is really incredibly recent. Just 10,000 years ago, there were one million of us. By 1800, just over 200 years ago, there were 1 billion of us. By 1960, 50 years ago, there were 3 billion of us. There are now over 7 billion of us. By 2050, your children, or your children’s children, will be living on a planet with at least 9 billion other people. Some time towards the end of this century, there will be at least 10 billion of us. Possibly more.

We got to where we are now through a number of civilisation- and society-shaping “events”, most notably the agricultural revolution, the scientific revolution, the industrial revolution and – in the West – the public-health revolution. By 1980, there were 4 billion of us on the planet. Just 10 years later, in 1990, there were 5 billion of us. By this point initial signs of the consequences of our growth were starting to show. Not the least of these was on water. Our demand for water – not just the water we drank but the water we needed for food production and to make all the stuff we were consuming – was going through the roof. But something was starting to happen to water. (via Humans – the real threat to life on Earth | Environment | The Observer)

Jul 19

klarondale:

everyone going to comic con: 

image

me:

image